Tag Archive: failed

Audi Failed Again To Beat Lm P2 Car

The exciting American Le Mans Series made its most recent stop at the Mosport International Raceway in Canada last weekend for the ninth race of the season. The most notable story before the race is Audi’s aim to break the winning streak of Le Mans Prototype 2 cars. Although Audi competes in the Le Mans Prototype 1 class, the team is looking to beat the faster LM P2 cars which have been the overall winners for six consecutive events going into the 2007 Grand Prix of Mosport. Unfortunately for the Audi team fielding a diesel race car, they failed to take the overall victory due to a mechanical problem late in the race.

Although the pair of Alan McNish and Rinaldo “Dindo” Capello failed to take the overall win at the race, they still managed to top all competitors in their class. The drivers posted their seventh win of the season and clinched the championship for their team with three races still remaining in the season. That means that they can now focus better in beating the lighter LM P2 cars.

McNish has this to say after the race: “My Audi R10 TDI was fast and strong while excellent team strategy had put us in control of the race. But with only a few minutes to go, I encountered a technical issue with the gearshift. I was stuck in fourth gear at times losing a lot of time. I lost the lead with five minutes remaining.”

“Despite Dindo and I claiming our seventh class win of the season and extending our championship lead, we’re obviously very disappointed having come so close to winning the race outright,” McNish added. Capello succeeded in taking a pole position for the race and with 15 minutes remaining and with McNish on behind the wheel of the Audi R10 TDI, their lead over their nearest rival is 29 seconds. That was before the problem with the gearbox occurred.

The pair now is looking to perform well at the upcoming race, the Belle Isle Detroit Grand Prix. Going into that race though, McNish admitted that the track will be difficult for their LM P1 cars developed by Audi, the same manufacturer of auto parts and accessories such as Audi floor mats. “Having just raced on one of the fastest tracks in the series at Mosport, we now head for what is likely to be one of the slowest,” said McNish. “I visited Detroit last month and saw that it’s a pretty slow, tight and flat concrete-lined track ? exactly the opposite to Mosport.”

“While I think it?ll be an exciting race for what is expected to be a big crowd, I think it’s going to prove extremely difficult for our Audi like most of the other ‘street? tracks,” the driver continued.

With seven straight victories for LM P2 cars over the more powerful but heftier LM P1 cars, it would be somewhat of an upset if an Audi R10 or any LM P1 car can beat the faster LM P2 cars at the next race.

Again Failed in DSA Driving Theory Test?

If you’ve just failed your practical UK car driving test again, then first let me say I’m sorry to hear that, after all it is one of the hardest driving tests in the world, with a national average pass rate of 40% for almost 2 million tests conducted each year.

Since you really want that full british driving licence to be able to legally and peacefully drive a car on the roads without having to constantly look over your shoulder for the police fearing points on your licence or a complete ban, then I’m sure you will be attempting to take the practical DSA car assessment again after the compulsory 10 waiting period, so here is some advice that might help stop you from failing the driving test.

1. The DL25 report sheet. Many of you would have probably torn this piece of paper up which the DSA driving examiner gave you after the test either because you were annoyed and didn’t agree with the decision or because you saw the test marking sheet as another record of your failure. If you still have any of the DL25 papers from your previous driving test attempts, I suggest you study them closely.

First of all take a note of the serious or dangerous faults that were marked down, they might not be the same each time, then not the other minor faults as well.

Before you attempt to go for another test, take some driving lessons specifically to deal with the serious errors, epecially if they also occurred as a minor error in a different test. Every individual has their own driving characteristics, and the DL25 sheet will give you a good idea of where your main faults that need to be worked on are. You can refer the driving test book or theory test book to pass the driving theory test.

2. Don’t take a break from driving. This is a common mistake most people make thinking that they need the time off to get themselves ready for the next test. Get another test booked as soon as possible, and continue with lessons on a weekly basis not only to maintain your current driving skills, but to also allow you to work on your weak areas. If you take a break, you will start to loose some of the good habits that you developed in the run up to the last test, and while you will not forget how to drive, the consistency of always checking your mirrors, using the right gear at a t-junction or being able to spot a safe gap at a roundabout and move off safely and smoothly will all be gone and that could have a big dent on your confidence especially after multiple attempts at the driving test and failing.

3. Read the Highway Code continually. All it takes is one road sign, marking and you could fail the driving test, so why not keep that theory test knowledge fresh by reading the Highway Code in between driving lessons. Make the time you spend on a bus or train to work useful and productive, it could save you money.

By not being hesitant at roundabouts, slowing down on main roads because cars are approaching fast from the left since you know the rules of the road is a useful skill that will boost your chances of passing.

4. Relax and concentrate on the test. Since it is not your first driving test, you know what is expected, deal with the immediate things and stop worrying about a mistake you made in the past or think about where the examiner is taking you or what maneuver you are going to be given next. If you successfully negotiate this roundabout in front of you, you are one step closer to passing the driving test. One step at a time is all you need.

5. Mistakes will happen. You will make a mistake on the test, but don’t worry about it, sometimes the mistake you make wouldn’t even be marked, but if you thinking about what you’ve just done wrong, you can’t fully deal with what is happening ahead. Many people have passed the driving test, and were surprised, because they remember making a driving error they thought had blown it, they kept on though, giving it the best and the fault turned out to be a minor. On the other hand others have been so upset by a fault, they gave up, committed more faults and failed, found out that the first fault they have given up on was only a minor, and the real failure happened when they gave up.

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